Teeth bonding vs veneers

Although both dental bonding and veneers are versatile cosmetic procedures that can be used to correct an array of cosmetic dental imperfections, including gaps, cracks, and discoloration, they have quite a few differences as well. 

Both procedures improve the appearance of teeth through the application of a material to the surface of the tooth, but they differ in terms of cost, durability, and the amount of preparation required.

So, how do you determine which procedure is right for you?

Dental Bonding vs. Veneers

Tooth preparation

When it comes to tooth preparation, dental veneers require more preparation than dental bonding. Veneers require the removal of a small amount of enamel from the surface of the tooth in order to make room for the veneer. Bonding does not require any preparation and can be applied directly to the surface of the tooth after a little etching to allow the material to adhere to the tooth properly.

Appearance 

Both dental veneers and dental bonding can improve the appearance of your teeth and smile. That said, veneers tend to be more natural-looking than bonding because they are made from porcelain or composite resin materials that closely match the shade and texture of natural teeth. Bonding is less natural-looking because it is made from a composite resin material that does not match the color or texture of natural teeth as closely as veneers do.

Dental bonding is reversible

The placement of veneers requires the dentist to shave off some enamel from the front surface of your tooth, which is not reversible. Tooth preparation for bonding, on the other hand, does not necessarily require the removal of any tooth enamel before applying the composite resin material, which makes the process reversible.

Veneers are more durable

When it comes to durability, dental veneers are generally more durable than dental bondingVeneers that use porcelain material are much tougher and less likely to break. Veneers typically last a long time, with porcelain veneers going for 10 to 20 years before the need for replacement, whereas you’ll need touchups every 3 to 10 years with dental bonding depending on the position of the tooth restored and your oral care habits.

Resin bonding is more prone to discoloration

Although dental materials are largely stain resistant, dental crowns and porcelain veneers are less likely to get discolored compared to resin bonding. That said, you will probably get a touchup before there’s any noticeable difference between the restored sections and your natural teeth.

Dental bonding is faster

While veneers are fabricated in a laboratory using a customized mold to achieve the right fit, which can take about two weeks, bonding is usually done on the spot – in a single appointment.

Bonding allows faster and convenient repairs

Since the entire bonding procedure is done in the dentist’s office, any touchups or repairs can be done in a single appointment. This is not possible with veneers, especially if a replacement veneer has to be designed and sent to a lab for fabrication, and then sent to your dentist for placement.

Dental bonding is more affordable 

Bonding is a single-appointment procedure that can be used as a cost-effective alternative to veneers. Since no lab work is involved, and only one dental professional will handle your case, dental bonding is quite affordable. 

So, what is the cost of veneers vs. dental bonding?

Dental veneers are generally more expensive than dental bonding. Veneers typically cost between $800 and $2,000 per tooth, while bonding typically costs between $300 and $600 per tooth or even less. The cost of both procedures can vary depending on the type of material used and the complexity of the procedure due to your specific case of tooth damage, as well as your location.

Final Thoughts

If you are looking to improve the appearance of your teeth, then dental veneers or dental bonding may be the right choice for you. 

Veneers are more expensive than bonding, but they are also more durable and natural-looking. Veneers are made from porcelain or composite resin materials that closely match the color and texture of natural teeth, while bonding is made from a composite resin material that does not match the color or texture of natural teeth as closely. 

Veneers also require more preparation than bonding, as they require the removal of a small amount of enamel from the surface of the tooth in order to make room for the veneer, which makes the treatment permanent and irreversible.

On the other hand, dental bonding is less expensive than veneers and does not require any preparation. Bonding is also less durable than veneers, typically lasting between 3 and 5 years with proper care, but it is quite easy to get the material replaced in a quick, same-day appointment, which will push you for another couple of years. So it is still be an effective way to improve the appearance of teeth.

Ultimately, it is important to consult with your dentist before making a decision about which procedure is right for you. Your dentist can help you weigh the pros and cons of each procedure and determine which one is best suited to your needs.

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  • Editorial team

    A team comprising oral health care professionals, researchers, and professional Writers, striving to impart you with the knowledge to improve your oral health, and that of your loved ones. 

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